Ответы на тестовую часть по ГИА - 2018 по английскому языку для 11 класса

Задание 1. Понимание текста и чтение.

Text 1.1

1. American Hop Museum is dedicated                                                                   A museum of popular drinks

 2. The Discover Sea Shipwreck Museum opened its doors                                 Back from the seas  

 3. The Seashore Trolley Museum is the oldest                                                      Still moving along

 4. The Money Museum in Colorado Springs is America's largest                       Not a bank but …

 5. The Kenneth G. Fiske Museum of Musical Instruments                            To play any tune 

 6. The Hammer Museum in Alaska is the world’s first                                    One tool museum    

7. The Salem Witch Museum brings you back                                                  Magic as attraction

Text 1.2.

1.The first mentioning of coffee goes as far back                                   From local use to international trade

2.While processing, a coffee bean absorbs heat, and                               Shades make difference

3.Coffee is one of the world's most widely consumed                             Secrets of popularity

4.For the best quality of brewed coffee it is necessary                             Secrets of storing for better taste

5.For occasions when one wants to enjoy the flavor of coffee                 Deceiving likeness

6.The Adoption of coffee created a unique social                                     Element of culture

7.A coffee bean is the seed of the coffee plant,                                        From fields to tables

 

 

Text 1.3.

1.Denmark, a small kingdom in northern Europe                                                  Hot spots for kids

  2. Denmark is the smallest Scandinavian country                                               Geography

3. More than four-fifths of all Danes live in towns                                                  Way of life

4. Denmark's fine beaches attract many visitors                                                    Places to stay in

  5. There is a wide selection of places to go out                                                    Nightlife

 6. Most Danes eat four meals a day – breakfast                                    Favourite food

 7. Almost all adult Danes can read and write                                        Education

Text1.4.

1. The Salem Witch Museum brings you back                                                  Magic as attraction

2. The Discover Sea Shipwreck Museum opened its doors                                 Back from the seas  

 3. The Seashore Trolley Museum is the oldest                                                      Still moving along

 4. American Hop Museum is dedicated                                                                   A museum of popular drinks

5The Money Museum in Colorado Springs is America's largest                       Not a bank but …

 6The Kenneth G. Fiske Museum of Musical Instruments                            To play any tune 

 7 The Hammer Museum in Alaska is the world’s first                                    One tool museum    

Text 1.5.

1. Born in 1743, Thomas Jefferson helped                                                             Borrowed ideas             

2. Postmodern architecture evolved from                                                         Extraordinary combinations               

3.  The Industrial Revolution in Europe brought about a new trend            Revolutionary materials

4.  By the early 1800s, Belfast had become                                                 It had its finest hour         

5. Thomas Andrews was the chief naval architect                                                 Brilliant ideas and brave deeds

 6. An e-book or “electronic book”                                                                              A long way to popularity

7. The Frankfurt Book Fair is held in October                                                         Ideas on sale

Text1.7.

1.Chocolate is made from the seeds of the tree Theobroma                 History of chocolate

2.You can receive a 'sweet tooth' from your parents                             Love of sweet from your father

3.All modern chocolate products have large amounts of sugar            Safe sweetness

4.Like other sweet food, chocolate helps endorphins, natural               Chocolate mania

5.Back in the 17th and 18th centuries, many scientific                         Help to dentists

6.Californian scientist Professor Carl Keen and his team                    Friend or enemy

7.Being very fat, or obese, is linked to many health                             Problems with weight

 

Text 1.8.

1. Entering the English language in the late nineteenth century           The word came first

2. The purpose of ecological tourism is to educate                               To preserve and respect

3. People who like seeing dangerous places,                                        Challenging the skillful

4. Culinary tourism is something you can enjoy if                               Taste of culture

5. Space tourism used to mean ordinary members                                Earth is not enough

6.The sports tourism industry has earned an international                     Not only exercising

7. To go to Tunisia to explore the place where the film                         Follow the idol

Text1.9.

1. An e-book or “electronic book”                                                                              A long way to popularity

2. Born in 1743, Thomas Jefferson helped                                                             Borrowed ideas             

3.  By the early 1800s, Belfast had become                                                 It had its finest hour      

4.     The Industrial Revolution in Europe brought about a new trend            Revolutionary materials

5. Thomas Andrews was the chief naval architect                                                 Brilliant ideas and brave deeds

 6. The Frankfurt Book Fair is held in October                                                         Ideas on sale

7. Postmodern architecture evolved from                                                         Extraordinary combinations               

Text1.10.

1. Dance is in my heart, in my blood and in my mind                               A hobby that carries away

2. Clothes play an important role in my life                                                    Personal style in a uniform

3. I believe that music has a bigger place                                                        Meaning without words

4. Even as an eighteen year old young adult                                                 Get a holiday spirit

5. People often try to get rid of the number thirteen                                      The number is not guilty

6. Many kids that go to public schools don’t wear                                         Yes to school uniform

7. They say that the music of your youth is the soundtrack                           Old but dear

Text 1.6  The Secret of Successful Small Talk

1. You're at a cocktail                                                                                              It's not so difficult

2. In the film ‘Annie Hall’ Diane                                                                              Start with the obvious things

3. TV journalist Barbara Walters                                                                            Pay compliments

4. Your face and your body can                                                                             Use friendly body language

5. A Victorian lady once compared                                                                    Turn the attention to others

    6. But people often don't listen                                                                           Pay attention

7. There are some topics that you                                                                          Avoid difficult themes

Text 1.11

1. Bali has been a surfing hotspot since the early 20th                                    Small size – great opportunities

2. Base jumping is an extreme sport, one which only                                    Breathtaking just to watch

3. Charles Darwin’s five-year voyage on H.M.S. Beagle has                       From travelling to discovery

4. Louis Pasteur's various investigations convinced him                               Hard to see and to believe

5. Frederick Law Olmsted, the architect who designed                                 Protected by law

6. The Maya thrived for nearly 2,000 years                                                   Hard to explain how they could

7. The 19th century was a remarkable time for                                              Inspired by noble goals

Text 1.12

1. This is a full-length (ninety minutes) cartoon,                                    Film for all ages

2. This is a full-blooded magnificently written portrait                          Interesting book

3. The young woman is shown in a “shepherdess” hat                           Portrait of a girl

 4. In this picture one is struck by artist’s absolute                                 Attractive landscape

5. Have a good time on the most lively and exciting                              Perfect holidays

6. This event is considered the greatest attraction                                  Colourful festival

 7. Do you like Latin American dancing                                               Exciting hobby

Text 1.13

1. The Mona Lisa, also known                                                            A happy comeback       

2. The tradition of telling stories with                                                   From Eastern to Western culture   

3. When the story in which Holmes died                                              Return of the popularity

4. Caviar refers to the salted eggs of the fish                                    Return to the market   

5. T.S. Eliot wrote in his poem                                                           They come back in spring         

6. When the eruption of Vesuvius                                                       Dangerous when rare

7. Iron Age Britain can only be understood                                         Back and deep into the past   

Text 1.14

1.Caviar refers to the salted eggs                                                           Return to the market            

2. Iron Age Britain can only be understood                                           Back and deep into the past        

3. The Mona Lisa, also known as La Giaconda                                      A happy comeback       

4. The tradition of telling stories                                                             From Eastern to Western culture         

5. When the story in which Holmes died                                                 Return of the popularity    

6. T.S. Eliot wrote in his poem, "The Waste Land,"                                  They come back in spring                      

7. When the eruption of Vesuvius started                                                Dangerous when rare   

Text1.15. Natural Links In a Long Chain of Being

I believe we are not alone. Even if I am on the other side of the world  from the farmhouse I live in , I still dream of the ancient vines out the window, and the shed out back that my grandfather's father built in 1870 with eucalyptus trunks. As long as I can recreate these images, 1)I never quite leave home.  All of us need some  grounding in our modern world

of constant moving, buying, selling, meeting and leaving. Some find constancy in religion, others in friends or community. But we need some  daily signposts that we are not different , not better, 2)not worse than those who came before us . For me, this house, farm, these ancient vines are those roots. Although I came into this world alone and will leave alone, I am not alone. There are ghosts of dozens of conversations in the hallways, stories I remember about buying new plows that now rust in the barnyard and ruined crops from the same vines 3) that we are now harvesting . All of us are natural links in a long chain of being, and that I  need to know what time of day it is , what season is coming, whether the wind 4)  is blowing north or from the east, and if the moon is still full tomorrow night, 5)just as the farmers who came before me did. The physical world around us constantly changes, 6) but human nature does not . We must  struggle in our brief existence to find some transcendent meaning and so find relief in the knowledge 7) that our ancestors have gone through this before. You may find that too boring, living with the past as present. I find it refreshing. There is an old answer to every new problem, that wise whispers of the past are with us . If we just listen and remember, we are not alone; we have been here before.

Text 1.16 Links With The Past

 I believe we are not alone. Even if I am on the other side of the world 1)from the farmhouse I live in, I still dream of the ancient vines out the window, and the shed out back that my grandfather's father built in 1870 with eucalyptus trunks. As long as I can recreate these images, I never quite leave home. All of us need some 2) grounding in our modern world of constant moving, buying, selling, meeting and leaving. Some find constancy in religion, others in friends or community. But we need some 3) daily signposts that we are not different , not better, not worse than those who came before us . For me, this house, farm, these ancient vines are those roots. Although I came into this world alone and will leave alone, I am not alone. There are ghosts of dozens of conversations in the hallways, stories I remember about buying new plows that now rust in the barnyard and 4) ruined crops from the same vines that we are now harvesting . All of us are natural links in a long chain of being, and that I 5) need to know what time of day it is  , what season is coming, whether the wind is blowing north or from the east, and if the moon is still full tomorrow night, just as the farmers who came before me did. The physical world around us constantly changes, but human nature does not . We must 6) struggle in our brief existence to find some transcendent meaning and so find relief in the knowledge that our ancestors have gone through this before. You may find that too boring, living with the past as present. I find it refreshing. There is an old answer to every new problem, that 7) wise whispers of the past are with us  . If we just listen and remember, we are not alone; we have been here before.

Text 1.17 There are many ways for a person to become famous. Before you read these pieces of advice, think if you really want to be a celebrity. So you have decided to do it. What should you do? First, try to be the best 1   at something or the first to do something .Be a better runner, or singer, or dancer, or an outstanding mother or father. Select a particular interest and become the best at it. But remember, it takes a great deal of patience and researching the area of expertise that you are interested in to become wellknown. Do not expect it to happen overnight. It's also necessary to remember that it is easy to become famous but much harder to become well-known for good reasons. The easiest way, 2    probably, is to be the worst at something, or be notorious. One singer sings so badly that people go to his concerts just to see his bad performances. Some people become famous for 3 committing crimes  or terrorist acts. Do not try 4 to jump off a building or a bridge because that type of fame will only be short lived, and you will have probably been killed. And if you're killed, you'll not have the opportunity to enjoy the fame. Being radically different or 5 being too generous is another road to fame. People notice you, and you in turn will become famous. Some extremely overweight women have recently become models, and are pictured on calendars and starred in hit movies. Being in the right place, 6 at the right time, can make you famous , too, maybe only for an hour, but at that time everyone will know who you are. Like a fireman who pulled the child out of the burning house. Following these steps you can really achieve success and become famous. Remember, 7 never to achieve anything at all                                                     .

 Text1.18. Arizona’s Dolly Steamboat

Spectacular Canyon Lake is situated in the heart of the Superstition Mountains in Arizona, giving home to the Dolly Steamboat. The Dolly Steamboat, 1) continuing a tradition of cruising since 1925, now cruises the secluded inner waterways of this beautiful lake. It is worth exploring this favourite destination of President Theodore Roosevelt who declared, “The Apache Trail and surrounding area combines the grandeur of the Alps, the glory of the Rockies, 2) the magnificence of the Grand Canyon and then adds something that nature has ever created in the wild.” You will marvel as you travel up to the national forest, which provides 3) the most inspiring and beautiful panorama that none of the others have. Every trip brings new discoveries of rock formations, geological history, and the flora and fauna distinct to the deserts of Arizona. Once aboard the Dolly Steamboat, you may view the majestic desert big horn sheep, bald eagles and a host bird of other wildlife, water fowl, 4) hovering over the magnificent lake. Experience the unique sound harmony that is created by the waters of Canyon Lake. Stretch out and relax at one of the tables or stand next to the railings on the deck. There is plenty of leg room on the Dolly. You will get 5) a unique chance to listen to the captain  who retells the legends of the mysterious past . All the passengers are treated with outstanding service and 6) personal attention to every need. Feel free to ask questions, move about and mingle with the crew. So enjoy an unforgettable vacation cruise and see for yourself why there is nothing quite 7) like a ride on Arizona’s Dolly Steamboat.

. Text1.19. Arizona’s Dolly Steamboat

Spectacular Canyon Lake is situated in the heart of the Superstition Mountains in Arizona, giving home to the Dolly Steamboat. The Dolly Steamboat, 1) continuing a tradition of cruising since 1925, now cruises the secluded inner waterways of this beautiful lake. It is worth exploring this favourite destination of President Theodore Roosevelt who declared, “The Apache Trail and surrounding area combines the grandeur of the Alps, the glory of the Rockies,  the magnificence of the Grand Canyon and then adds something 2) that nature has ever created in the wild.” You will marvel as you travel up to the national forest, which provides the most inspiring and beautiful panorama 3)that none of the others have. Every trip brings new discoveries of rock formations, geological history, and the flora and fauna distinct to the deserts of Arizona. Once aboard the Dolly Steamboat, you may view the majestic desert big horn sheep, bald eagles and a host bird of other wildlife, water fowl, 4) hovering over the magnificent lake. Experience the unique sound harmony that is created by the waters of Canyon Lake. Stretch out and relax at one of the tables or stand next to the railings on the deck. There is plenty of leg room on the Dolly. You will get a unique chance to listen to the captain  5)who retells the legends of the mysterious past . All the passengers are 6)treated with outstanding service and  personal attention to every need. Feel free to ask questions, move about and mingle with the crew. So enjoy an unforgettable vacation cruise and see 7)for yourself why there is nothing quite  like a ride on Arizona’s Dolly Steamboat.

 

Text1.20. Number of Teenagers with Saturday Job Drops

The number of teenagers with Saturday jobs has dropped. Young people do not acquire any experience for their CVs - a crucial step towards getting full-time work. The proportion of teenagers combining part-time jobs with school or college has slumped from 40% in the 1990s to around 20% now, according to the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES), a government agency. Latest figures show that only 1) 260,000 teenagers have a Saturday job compared with 435,000  in 1997. The trend is not just recession-related, but the result of an increasing expectation that young people should stay on at school, as well as a falling number of Saturday jobs, according to the report. Many of 2)the jobs that young people do, such as bar work, are in long-term decline, and are forecast to decline further over the next decade.

"Recruiters place significant emphasis on experience … 3)but young people are leaving education increasingly less experienced," the report says. Word of mouth is the most common way to get a job,but an increasing shortage of work experience means young people 4)are unable to build up informal contacts, it adds. Ms. Todd, a commissioner at the UKCES, said: "There's more emphasis on doing well at school, young people are finding less time to do what they would have done a few years ago. "I think it's also the changing structure of the labour market. Retail is still a big employer, 5) but a lot more of it is being done online. As a consequence, we need to think about how we get young people the work experience they need." A new initiative to send employees into state schools 6) to talk about their careers  was also launched recently. The scheme, Inspiring the Future, is meant to give state schoolchildren access to the kind of careers advice that private schools offer. The deputy prime minister said: "The power of making connections that inspire young people is immeasurable and 7) can be life-changing."

 

Text 1.21 Early work opportunities

Research has shown a sharp fall in the number of teenagers who do Saturday jobs. It seems such a shame – my Saturday job as a kitchen porter was something of a rite of passage. I'll never forget long hours 1 ) that I spent in the kitchen of a busy country pub in East Sussex scouring grease off huge saucepans and griddles. Working atmosphere there helped me grow a thicker skin, develop quicker banter and, most importantly, taught me the value of hard work. It also resulted in a steady supply of cash, 2) which I would happily spend as I liked I'm not the only one who has strong memories of weekend work. DJ Trevor Nelson said everyone should be able to have a Saturday job: "It taught me a lot, 3) and things would be different if everyone was given the chance .  The 4) link between the type of Saturday job a celebrity performed and their later career is sometimes obvious. Dragon's Den star and businessman Peter Jones, for example, showed early promise by starting his own business. "I passed my Lawn Tennis Association coaching exam, 5) and I persuaded my local club to let me use a court on Saturdays ," he explains. "At the start I was coaching other kids, 6) working long hours  , for which I could charge £25–30 an hour. While my friends on milk rounds were getting £35 a week, I was doing five hours on a Saturday and earning four times as much."  Skier Chemmy Alcott got a job working for the Good Ski Guide, on the advertising side. "It became clear to me what my personal value to companies could be. It led directly to me finding my head sponsor … and it offered me an eight-year contract. That gave me the financial backing 7) which I needed to become a professional skier  ." As part of its response to the Saturday job statistics, the UK Commission for Employment and Skills said a lack of early work opportunities makes it harder for young people to acquire experience for their CVs.

 

Text 1.22 'Tune In, Turn On and Drop Out' was the motto of the hippie movement that grew partially out of young America's disillusionment with the Vietnam War. Hippies were mainly white teenagers and young adult 1 who shared distrust towards traditional values and authority  . The immediate precursor to the hippies was the so-called Beat Generation of the late 1950-s. But where the intellectual beats tended to stay out of politics, the hippies were known as much for their political outspokenness 2 as for their long hair and colourful clothing  . Their opposition to the Vietnam War became one of the most significant aspects of the growing antiwar movement throughout the latter half of the 1960-s. To express their protests and to 'turn on' others, the hippies used 3 art, street theatre and particularly music. This culture reached its peak in the summer of 1967, when a concert in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park introduced the music of the hippies to a wider audience. The concert inspired thousands of young people around the country to head to San Francisco, 4 some wearing flowers in their hair . In the 60's hippies sought to free themselves from *societal restrictions, choose their own way and find new meaning in life. This made hippies instantly recognizable to one another and served 5 as a visual symbol of their willingness to question authority . Hippies often chose brightly coloured clothing. Much of hippie clothing was self-made, and hippies often purchased their clothes from flea markets and secondhand shops. Natural and foreign accessories for both men and women included Native American jewellery, headbands and long beaded necklaces. Tie-dyeing was very fashionable 6 as part of hippie style and still is today . Hippie culture spread worldwide through a fusion of rock music, folk and blues, it also found expression in literature, fashion and the visual arts, 7 as part of hippie style and still is today. Eventually the hippie movement extended far beyond the United States, the United Kingdom, Europe and appeared in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Japan, Brazil and many other countries.

 

Text 1.23 Healthy School Meals

Children at Southdown Infants School in Bath enjoy tasty homemade meals such as roast turkey with fresh vegetables, chicken, salad and fresh fruit for pudding. Vegetables are 1) local, fresh and organic where possible . Instead of crisps, chocolate and sweets, the school canteen serves organic carrots, dried fruit and fresh seasonal fruit in bags for 10p, 2) and about 100 bags are sold each day  . Southdown's healthy eating initiative began four years ago with the start of a breakfast club. Now Ms Culley, the head teacher of the school, says that the teachers very clearly see the link between diet and concentration. “Children's concentration and behaviour 3definitely improve after a good meal.” The teachers would also like to give the children the experience of eating together . It turned out that some children weren't used to that. Pupils are also encouraged to find out more about where their food comes from by 4)visiting a local farm  .Parents are also involved and are invited in to try school dinners on special occasions, 5) such as Easter and Christmas  .The efforts of staff, pupils and parents to create a healthy eating environment were recognized earlier this month 6) when the school was awarded  the Best School Dinner award. Ms Culley said: “We are happy to win this award. 7) healthy eating is at the centre of everything we do. It's really rewarding to see so many children enjoy real food.”

 

Text 1.24 Habit Of Eating Fast Causes Obesity

 

If you eat very quickly, it may be enough to increase your risk of being overweight, research suggests.

Osaka University scientists looked at the eating habits of 3,000 people. Just about half of them told researchers that they 1)

have a habit of eating quickly . Compared with those who did not eat quickly, fast-eating men were 84% more likely to be overweight, and women were 100% more likely to 2) put on weight .Japanese scientists said that there were a number of reasons why eating fast 3) could be bad for your weight  . They said it could prevent the work of a signalling system which tells your brain to stop eating because your stomach is full. They said: "If you eat quickly you basically fill your stomach before the system has a chance to react, so you 4) just overfill your stomach  ."  The researchers also explained that a mechanism that helps make us fat today, developed with evolution and helped people get more food in the periods when 5) they were short of it . The scientists added that the habit of eating fast could be received from one's parents genes or 6) learned at a very early age .They said that, if possible, children should be taught to 7) eat as slowly as possible  , and allowed to stop when they felt full up at mealtimes. "The advice of our grandmothers about chewing everything 20 times might be true - if you take a bit more time eating, it could have a positive influence on your weight."

 

 

Text 1.25 Speed of Eating is 'Key to Obesity'

If you eat very quickly, it may be enough to increase your risk of being overweight, research suggests.

Osaka University scientists looked at the eating habits of 3,000 people. Just about half of them told researchers that they 1)

have a habit of eating quickly . Compared with those who did not eat quickly, fast-eating men were 84% more likely to be overweight, and women were 100% more likely to 2) put on weight .Japanese scientists said that there were a number of reasons why eating fast 3) could be bad for your weight  . They said it could prevent the work of a signalling system which tells your brain to stop eating because your stomach is full. They said: "If you eat quickly you basically fill your stomach before the system has a chance to react, so you 4) just overfill your stomach  ."  The researchers also explained that a mechanism that helps make us fat today, developed with evolution and helped people get more food in the periods when 5) they were short of it . The scientists added that the habit of eating fast could be received from one's parents genes or 6) learned at a very early age .They said that, if possible, children should be taught to 7) eat as slowly as possible  , and allowed to stop when they felt full up at mealtimes. "The advice of our grandmothers about chewing everything 20 times might be true - if you take a bit more time eating, it could have a positive influence on your weight."

 

Text 1.26 Saturday Jobs: Memories of Weekend Working

Research has shown a sharp fall in the number of teenagers who do Saturday jobs. It seems such a shame – my Saturday job as a kitchen porter was something of a rite of passage. I'll never forget long hours 1 ) that I spent in the kitchen of a busy country pub in East Sussex scouring grease off huge saucepans and griddles. Working atmosphere there helped me grow a thicker skin, develop quicker banter and, most importantly, taught me the value of hard work. It also resulted in a steady supply of cash, 2) which I would happily spend as I liked I'm not the only one who has strong memories of weekend work. DJ Trevor Nelson said everyone should be able to have a Saturday job: "It taught me a lot, 3) and things would be different if everyone was given the chance .  The 4) link between the type of Saturday job a celebrity performed and their later career is sometimes obvious. Dragon's Den star and businessman Peter Jones, for example, showed early promise by starting his own business. "I passed my Lawn Tennis Association coaching exam, 5) and I persuaded my local club to let me use a court on Saturdays ," he explains. "At the start I was coaching other kids, 6) working long hours  , for which I could charge £25–30 an hour. While my friends on milk rounds were getting £35 a week, I was doing five hours on a Saturday and earning four times as much."  Skier Chemmy Alcott got a job working for the Good Ski Guide, on the advertising side. "It became clear to me what my personal value to companies could be. It led directly to me finding my head sponsor … and it offered me an eight-year contract. That gave me the financial backing 7) which I needed to become a professional skier  ." As part of its response to the Saturday job statistics, the UK Commission for Employment and Skills said a lack of early work opportunities makes it harder for young people to acquire experience for their CVs.

 

Text 1.27 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria in 1756. His father was a great violinist and composer. Wolfgang showed an interest in music from a very early age. Leonard encouraged him to learn the harpsichord and from the first day, 1 the boy showed incredible talent. His sister Maria Anna was also a fine musician. In 1765 Leopold took his two children on a performance tour of Munich and Vienna. Mozart soon became well-known in all Austria. Everywhere 2 people were astonished by his musical talent _. He could play the piano and violin as well as the harpsichord. At the age of 11 he was writing keyboard pieces, oratories, symphonies and operas. His first major work was performed in Milan in 1770, when he was still only 14. He was a great hero for young people, who whistled the tunes from The Marriage of Figaro, 3 when they walked down the streets. The Archbishop of Salzburg heard about the young Mozart and invited him to be his orchestra Konzertmeister when he was still only fifteen. The world was at Mozart's feet. He was writing a huge amount of music and 4 earning enough money to live well. He worked in Salzburg for nearly ten years but he didn't like the archbishop. The composer was restless and needed a change. In 1781 he left his post and moved to Vienna. He loved Vienna and 5 was in great demand as a performer and a compose. Other composers asked him to teach them. His first opera, The Abduction from the Seraglio, was a hit. His fame spread. In 1782 he met Constance Weber and asked her to marry him. Life wasn't easy after their marriage. Mozart was a poor businessman, and he never had enough money. For the next ten years, his music was not always popular, and he became poorer and poorer. In 1788 he stopped 6 performing in public  but continued to compose. A nobleman asked him to compose a requiem. His financial problems were over but he was already a very sick man and he died 7 before he could finish the piece. When he died in 1791 at the age of thirty-five, he was buried in a pauper's grave.

 

 

Text 1.28 Barbie Barbie, the glamorous blonde doll beloved by little girls around the world, is 1an icon of American femininity  . She is also the most long-lived toy on the market, a fact that was celebrated throughout the world when she recently had her 40th birthday. But in a tiny village in Bavaria there was no celebration, only bitterness and regret. In the Hausser home Rolf and Lily ignored the global celebrations 2 and instead complained bitterly, as they have done so many times over the past four decades, about how badly they have been treated by history, or, to be more accurate, by Barbie's secret history. Like many stars, Barbie is not what she seems. Not only is she older than her official age but Barbie is not her real name, what's more, she isn't even American, she's German. Barbie's real name is in fact Lili. She is 45, not 40, and was born in a small town near Nuremberg. The secret story of the Barbie doll is about small-town naivety against big business determination. Above all, it is 3a story of the tragedy of bitter old man  , a man who has been erased from Barbie's history so completely that only a few people in the world know that he was the true creator of the Barbie doll. But instead of making a fortune when she became a worldwide success, Rolf Hausser lost everything. It was in 1952 that Lili was born, 4in her first incarnation  , as a cartoon character for the daily German newspaper Bild Zeitung. Their cartoonist Beuthin had the idea of a girl who was sexy, 5but essentially innocent  with a snub nose and a face like an angel. She was named Lili, and by 1955 she was so popular that Beuthin suggested that a doll should be made 6as a present for visitors  to the newspaper. After many attempts to find the right toymaker, he finally found Rolf Hausser, the son of a famous toy manufacturer, who together with his brother Kurt had set up a very successful toy company called O&M Hausser. Rolf was fascinated by the idea of making a doll 7with the shape and curves of a mature woman  , and he agreed to try. Lili the doll went on the market on August 12, 1955, and became an overnight success.

 

Text 1.29 Which place

1. Is a place of rocks and caves?                                             Panama Rocks

 2. Is rich in building material?                                                Potsdam

 3. Was a publishing centre?                                                      Herkimer          

 4. Was an important medical centre?                                    Saranac Lake 

 5. Is a birthplace of a famous poet?                                        Huntington     

 6. Was described in many books?                                          Cooperstown

7. Is a centre of making medical tools?                                    Rochester

 

     Text 1.30 Battle to Save Protected Species

 

1. What did the rhinos do when they saw the writer's safari party?   C) They paused for a moment before leaving.

2. What did Jitu say about the tiger they had missed?                       C) It kept changing direction.

3. Why did the rhinos and tigers begin to disappear in the 1950s? B) The jungle was cut down.

 4. The greatest danger to the men who guard the park                   B) comes from poachers.

5. What do the locals think of the park?                                                 A) It should be used to grow crops.

6. What do some rhinos and tigers do at night?                                 D) They search for food outside the park.

7. How do the park guards get information about poachers?      A) Some locals are paid to spy for them.

 

Text 1.31 The Enjoyment in Reading

 

1. The unlimited liberty of reading for the narrator means  B) freedom in choosing and interpreting books.

2. The narrator thinks that his love of reading   C) was initially fostered by Mr. Buxton.

3. The narrator gives credit to Mr. Buxton for teaching him how to D) find the meaning of a book for oneself.

4. The history teacher quoted famous historians to prove that people D) should learn from history not to make similar mistakes.

5. According to Umberto Eco, an open text is a text  B) plus the reader’s attitude to it.

6. Some critics say about text interpretation that  D) there is the right interpretation to every book..

7. The narrator believes that   D) one should find a proper interpretation by oneself.

Text 1.32 Are you a vegetarian or a meat eater?

 

1.Speaking about her vegetarianism, the author admits that … B) there were times when she thought she might abandon it.

2. According to the author, how much of processed meat a day is enough to raise the chance of pancreatic cancer by more than a half?  D) From 150 g.

3. “This” in paragraph 4 stands for …  A) information.

4. Why does the author think that her information can’t be shocking? B) It’s not news.

5. Saying “sympathy is in short supply these days”, the author means that …

C) people tend to blame sick people in their sickness.

6. The author is disappointed that eating meat is …  A) not considered as bad as drinking and smoking.

7. The author believes that meat eaters are very …  D) irresponsible.

 

Text 1.33 The Joy and Enthusiasm of Reading

 

1. The unlimited liberty of reading for the narrator means  B) freedom in choosing and interpreting books.

2. The narrator thinks that his love of reading   C) was initially fostered by Mr. Buxton.

3. The narrator gives credit to Mr. Buxton for teaching him how to D) find the meaning of a book for oneself.

4. The history teacher quoted famous historians to prove that people D) should learn from history not to make similar mistakes.

5. According to Umberto Eco, an open text is a text  B) plus the reader’s attitude to it.

6. Some critics say about text interpretation that  D) there is the right interpretation to every book..

7. The narrator believes that   D) one should find a proper interpretation by oneself.

 

Text 1.34

 

1. Why hadn't the writer tried bungee-jumping before?                 C) He wanted it to be in a special place.

2. According to the writer, what was the disadvantage of the queue?  D) It meant you had the chance to change your mind. 3. According to the writer, how did the young girl seem to feel about her experience? B) glad that the whole thing was over. 4. How did the writer feel while the equipment was being fitted?     A) relieved that his turn had come.

5. What are the «grab rails» designed to do?                                     C) provide you with support

6. What made the writer jump in the end?                                           D) He realized there was no great danger.

7. «it» in paragraph 4 refers to                                                               A) a feeling of fear

 

Text 1.35 Valuable Experience

 

1. The Australian Tourism Office employs a new caretaker twice a year.  A) Not stated

2. There was no Internet on the islands of the Great Barrier Reef.   C) False

3. People from different countries applied for the job.   B) True

4. Ben Southall was a good swimmer.  C) True

5. While working as a caretaker Ben Southall had lots of free time.  C) False

6. To do his job Ben Southall had to communicate with journalists.  B) True

7. Ben Southhall was taken to hospital after a shark attack.  A) False

 

Text 1.36

 

1. The main reason of Arthur Burdon's visit to Paris was                      . D) his bride Margaret.

2. Arthur Burdon was sure of                                                                      B) Margaret's love.

3. Dr. Porhoet found it strange to                                                              A) delay the wedding without any causes.

4. Arthur and Margaret postponed the wedding because                    D) Margaret didn't seem prepared for marriage.

5. Before her journey to Paris Margaret discovered that                            A) her father had left no fortune to her.

6. Arthur was … to know that Margaret had learnt the truth about her financial affairs.       C) confused

7. Arthur didn't want Margaret to                                                         C) marry him following the feeling of gratitude. 

Задание 2 Лексико - грамматические тесты

Text 2.1 The Secret Tunnel In the middle of our village, there is a beautiful old church, which dates back to the beginning of the Middle Ages. It was rebuilt several times, but some of its parts, including the foundations, are 1) original . Well, 2) speaking about restoration, a while ago they decided to install a heating system there, as it gets cold in winter. Some of the local boys volunteered to help, including myself. The benches were connected in stacks, so it was hard work to lift or to push them away, but we managed it. Most of the church floor was covered with marble-type slabs, but under some benches there were just some ancient-looking bricks. We got really 3) excited , amazed , as we had heard stories about an old underground passageway leading from a crypt below the church to the castle in the nearest city. It is twelve miles 4) away So, a friend of mine and I started to dig down there. It was relatively easy to pull out the top layer of bricks, and underneath them we found soil, which also moved easily as it was completely dry. We found that one side of the hole was so soft that you could just 5 ) push a stick through it. It was obviously that passageway! Then some workmen came in and told us to stop. Just fancy that! We had to stop at the most exciting moment. After a few days, the workmen put a layer of hard cement over the entire floor, so our find remained a mystery. But I won’t give 6) up . I still hope to go there some day and find that secret tunnel. Maybe, that will become the greatest 7) discovery of the 21st century.

Text 2.2 Pierre and Faniry At the age of twenty-one, Pierre – that was the name of the winegrower – had been sent by his father to spend some time with his uncle in Madagascar. He 1) arrived at the island and within two weeks he fell for a local girl called Faniry, or "Desire" in Malagasy. You could not blame him. At seventeen she was ravishing. In the Malagasy sunlight her skin was golden. Her black, waist-length hair, which hung straight beside her cheeks, framed large, fathomless eyes. It was a genuine love at first 2) sight , for both of them. Within five months they were married. Faniry had no family, but Pierre's parents came out from France for the wedding, even though they did not strictly 3) approve of it, and for three years the young couple lived very happily on the island of Madagascar. Then, one day, a telegram came from France. Pierre's parents and his only brother had been killed in a car crash. Pierre took the next flight home to 4) attend the funeral and manage the vineyard left by his father. Faniry followed two weeks later. Pierre was grief-stricken, but with Faniry he 5) settled down to running the vineyard. His family, and the lazy, idyllic days under a tropical sun, were gone forever. But he was very happily married, and he was very well-off. Perhaps, he reasoned, life in Bordeaux would not be so bad. Pierre thought he had married an angel, but soon he found 6) out that he was wrong. He had 7) made a fatal mistake in marrying Faniry.

Text 2.3 New York City Life is made up of little things: some unimportant memories from childhood that, in fact, shaped your character. I 1) grew up on Third Avenue in midtown Manhattan during the 1950s-60s where family life was centred around old 2) blocks of flats and small stores. Third Avenue was my old neighbourhood and it had character. It was 3) filled with working families of Italian, German and Irish origin. We shopped together with all those people and their kids played together. Third Avenue influenced the way our family lived. I absorbed the street life. It gave me an 4) education that I could not have received in any other place. To me, it was home. In a recent walk around Third Avenue my eyes 5) looked for signs of the old neighbourhood but couldn’t find any. If I hadn't been born here and someone described the area, it would be 6) hard to believe. It wasn't because a few buildings had changed – everything had changed. The transformation began in the late 1950s and 60s when corporations replaced the old neighbourhood. In the early 1960s, the houses were pulled down. Families were forced to 7) move out , the small stores went out of business and the old neighbourhood was changed forever. And now there is a lack of character in the transformed neighbourhood.

Text 2.4 No Chance to Escape Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 1) required the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn’t hesitate to 2) remind her that they had lost two similar contracts that week. To 3) tell the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00. Diana adored her children. At first 4) glimpse she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 5) few moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic. She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 6) made hastily on a Friday evening could be 7) regretted in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

Text 2.5 The Prize William and Philippa were rivals. They were considered the best students at New College. At the beginning of the third year they applied for the Charles Oldham Shakespeare prize for an essay. The chosen theme for the prize essay that year was “Satire in Shakespeare”. Troilus and Cressida clearly called for the most attention, but both students 1) managed to find satirical nuances in almost every play by Shakespeare. As the year was coming to an end, 2) hardly anyone doubted that either William or Philippa would win the prize while the other would come in second. 3) However , no one was willing to express an opinion as to who the victor would be. Before the prize essay submission date, they both had to take their final degree examinations. 4) Few students studied as hard as William and Philippa. It came as no surprise to anyone that they both achieved first-class degrees in the final honors school. Rumor spread around the university that the two rivals had been awarded аs in every one of their nine papers. “I would be willing to believe that is the case,” Philippa 5) told William. “But I feel I must point out to you that there is a considerable difference between an A-plus and an A-minus.” “I couldn’t agree with you more,” said William. “But 6) remember , when you discover who has won the Charles Oldham, you will know who was awarded less.” It turned 7) out that the examiners felt unable on this occasion to award the prize to one person and had therefore decided that it should be shared by William and Philippa.

Text 2.6 To the North of London The Aldenham Country Park is a large and pleasant area easily reached if you are travelling north out of London. It is worth visiting if you want a quick breath of fresh air and a reasonably attractive place for a brief picnic. The most important point of the park is Aldenham Reservoir. It was built in 1796 to 1 ) maintain the water level in the river 2 ) affected by the newly constructed Grand Union Canal, and more recently has been used as a reserve public water supply. Not far from there lies the busy town of Watford which can be recommended for a brief visit. And in any 3 ) case much more interesting stretches of the canal are met further north. And if you make your way through the town you can visit the Watford Museum in the High Street which has materials on printing and paper-making on 4) display . The picture gallery has changing exhibitions of works by artists who lived or painted in the area. Another attraction of the neighbourhood is a fascinating complex of Roman buildings, the 5 ) remains of a great city, once the third largest centre of Roman Britain. The private houses were impressive, many of them furnished with mosaic floors. The beauty of the mosaics can hardly be described on paper, and it is best 6 ) appreciated by standing and looking for a while. The other principal Roman site to be visited is a long stretch of the city wall which 7) dates back to the 3rd century

Text 2.7 BRITISH THEATRE The theatre has always been very strong in Britain. Its centre is, of course, London, where successful plays can perform 1) without a break for many years. London has several dozens of theatres, most of them not 2) far from Trafalgar Square. Outside London even some quite big towns have no public theatre at all, but every town has its 3) private theatres. British theatre is much 4) admired. There you can get the 5) best of everything – an excellent orchestra, famous conductors, celebrated actors and a well-dressed audience. 6) Choose a good play, and you’ll enjoy yourself throughout from the moment the curtain goes up to the end of the last act. Get your seats beforehand, either at the box-office at the theatre itself. You’ll 7) probably want to sit as near to the stage as possible.

Text 2.8 Sharing Music with Friends Brenda is a nineteen-year old full-time college student, and she earns money working part time as a waitress. Brenda loves to listen to music like most young people, but she can’t 1) afford the high CD prices that record companies 2) charge for popular CDs. Brenda says that the prices of CDs are ridiculously high at $17 to $20 each and there are only two or three good songs on each CD. She 3) rents an apartment with three other roommates. She pays her own 4) tuition and she also pays most of her 5) expenses . Her solution to expensive CDs is to download or copy music from the Internet. Brenda and millions of other people are called “downloaders” because they download free file-sharing software and music. When Brenda later gives, shares, or trades her music files free over the Internet, she is also an uploader. She considers herself an active music uploader, but the music industry considers her a 6) thief. From 2001 on, the Recording Industry Association of America has sued and fined dozens of file-sharing services, for uploading music files, and hundreds of people, for 7) breaking the law by downloading music.

Text 2.9 Busy Day Let me tell you what happened once when my dear Uncle Podger decided to hang a picture on the wall. He told us not to 1 ) worry and just watch him do it. He said he would do it by himself. Well, he came up to the picture which was waiting to be put up in the dining room and took it. But suddenly it fell down and the glass 2) broke into pieces and he cut his finger. He started to 3 ) look for his handkerchief but couldn’t find it because he had put it in his coat and none of us knew where his coat was. “Six of you!” Uncle Podger exclaimed, “and you cannot find the coat that I put down only five minutes ago!” But then he got up from his chair and found that he had been sitting on his coat the whole time. “Oh, you can stop your 4 search . I’ve found it myself!” Then after an hour was spent in tying up his finger Uncle Podger wondered where the hammer had disappeared to. And while everybody was trying to get the hammer he was standing on the chair saying: “Well, I want to know if you are going to 5 ) keep me here all evening!” Finally the hammer was found, but we noticed that the nail which he had prepared was lost. And, of course, Uncle Podger didn’t keep 6 ) silent while he was waiting for another nail to be brought. We heard all he had to say about our habit of losing all the things he needed. When the picture was hanging on the wall at last, everybody looked very 7) tired, all except Uncle Podger, who was lively as ever. Aunt Maria remarked that if Uncle Podger wanted to do a job like that again, she would spend a week with her mother until it was over.

Text 2.10 Dinner Amos Finnister was a private detective. In all his years as a policeman and a private investigator, he had learned about people. He gained a psychological insight into most as he 1) watched them do foolish things. He was at ease with people from all walks of life, and in consequence they were at ease with him. And this was most apparent on Friday evening, when Major Cedric Crawford dined with him at the Ritz restaurant. Amos 2) used to dine there when he lived in New York. By the time they were halfway through dinner, Amos had the major laughing and sharing stories, some of which were funny. By the time they had eaten the main course, Amos felt comfortable enough to 3) seek the answer to an important question. “I wonder if you have ever come across Tabitha James.” Cedric 4) admitted knowing Tabitha with no sign of embarrassment or reluctance. “To 5) tell the truth, I knew her quite well, actually. She was a close friend of a fellow guards officer, Sebastian Lawford. She fell in love with him at first sight. They were going to marry but unfortunately that did not come to pass.” “And why was that, Major, do you know?” “Oh, yes, I’m afraid I do. Tabitha had contracted pneumonia but 6) paid no attention to her illness. Before I knew it, she was dead and gone. As for Sebastian, he rejoined the army when the war broke out and was killed. A sad story, isn’t it?” Amos nodded. So much depended 7) on this information.

Text 2.11 Ordinary “Ordinary” was the worst word she could find for anything. She and I would argue fiercely because I wanted to be ordinary as desperately as my mother wanted to be 1)unusual. “I can’t 2) stand that hair-do”, she said when I went to the hairdresser with my friend and came back with a pageboy haircut straight out of Seventeen magazine, “It’s so terribly ordinary”. Not ugly, not unsuitable. But ordinary. Her fear of ordinariness came out most strongly in her clothes. “Couldn’t you please 3) wear something else?” I asked her when she was dressing for Parents’ Day in tight-fitting pants and a bright pink sweater, with a Mexican cape. “What’s wrong with my outfit?” What wasn’t wrong with it! “It’s just that I wish it would be something more plain,” I said sheepishly, “something that people won’t 4) stare at.” She looked at me angrily and drew herself 5) up to her full height of five feet ten inches. “Are you 6)ashamed of your own mother? Because if you are, Isadora, I feel 7) sorry for you. I really do.”

Text 2.12 Philip and Michael Philip Masters was a millionaire now. 1)However , everyone in the club was aware that he had built up his own business from scratch after he had left his first job as a kitchen salesman. “Ready-Fit Kitchens” had started in a shed at the end of Philip’s garden. Later, he 2) succeeded in building a factory on the other side of town that employed more than three hundred people. Ten years later, the financial press speculated that Philip’s business was worth a couple of million. When five more years later the company was taken over by the John Lewis Partnership, Philip got seventeen million pounds. 3) Few businessmen were as lucky as he was. Philip was married for more than twenty years. He had fallen in love with Sally at first 4) sight . Now Sally was chairman of the regional branch of the Save the Children Fund. Their son had just won a place at St Anne’s College, Oxford. Michael was the boy’s godfather. Michael Gilmour could 5) hardly be a greater contrast. On leaving school, where Philip had been his closest friend, he 6) failed to find a permanent job. He started out as a trainee with Watneys, but lasted only a few months. Then he started to work as a reporter with a publishing company. He drifted from job to job. 7) Like Philip, he married his childhood sweetheart, Carol West, the daughter of a local doctor. They had a daughter. Michael seemed to have settled down at last.

Text 2.13 A good cook Old Margaret was just the kind of cook that we wanted. Lots of cooks can do rich dishes well. Margaret couldn’t. But she 1) used to cook simple, everyday dishes in a way that made our mouths water. Her apple-pies were the best pies I’ve ever tasted. But to 2)tell the truth, even Margaret sometimes miscalculated. A large, royal-looking steak would be set before Father, which, upon being cut into, would turn 3) out to be underdone. Father’s face would darken with disappointment. He would raise his foot and stamp slowly and heavily three times on the rug. At this solemn 4) signal , we would hear Margaret leave the kitchen below us and come up the stairs to the dining-room door. “Margaret, look at the steak.” Margaret would peer with a shocked look at the platter. She would then seize the platter and make off with it. Father and Margaret were united by the intense interest they both took in cooking. Each understood the other instinctively. I have to 5) admit that they had a complete fellow-feeling. Mother’s great interest was in babies. She loved her children and her happiness depended 6) on them. She wanted to keep Father pleased somehow, and if it was too difficult or impossible she didn’t always care about even that. At table it was Father who carved the fowl, or sliced the roast lamb or beef. I liked to 7) watch him take the knife and go at it. And usually the cooking had been as superb as the carving. Sometimes it was so perfect that Father would summon Margaret and say in a low voice, “You are a good cook”.

Text 2.14 New York City: Nostalgia for the Old Neighbourhood Life is made up of little things: some unimportant memories from childhood that, in fact, shaped your character. I 1) grew up on Third Avenue in midtown Manhattan during the 1950s-60s where family life was centred around old 2) blocks of flats and small stores. Third Avenue was my old neighbourhood and it had character. It was 3) filled with working families of Italian, German and Irish origin. We shopped together with all those people and their kids played together. Third Avenue influenced the way our family lived. I absorbed the street life. It gave me an 4) education that I could not have received in any other place. To me, it was home. In a recent walk around Third Avenue my eyes 5) looked for signs of the old neighbourhood but couldn’t find any. If I hadn't been born here and someone described the area, it would be 6) hard to believe. It wasn't because a few buildings had changed – everything had changed. The transformation began in the late 1950s and 60s when corporations replaced the old neighbourhood. In the early 1960s, the houses were pulled down. Families were forced to 7) move out , the small stores went out of business and the old neighbourhood was changed forever. And now there is a lack of character in the transformed neighbourhood.

Text 2.14 New York City: Nostalgia for the Old Neighbourhood Life is made up of little things: some unimportant memories from childhood that, in fact, shaped your character. I 1) grew up on Third Avenue in midtown Manhattan during the 1950s-60s where family life was centred around old 2) blocks of flats and small stores. Third Avenue was my old neighbourhood and it had character. It was 3) filled with working families of Italian, German and Irish origin. We shopped together with all those people and their kids played together. Third Avenue influenced the way our family lived. I absorbed the street life. It gave me an 4) education that I could not have received in any other place. To me, it was home. In a recent walk around Third Avenue my eyes 5) looked for signs of the old neighbourhood but couldn’t find any. If I hadn't been born here and someone described the area, it would be 6) hard to believe. It wasn't because a few buildings had changed – everything had changed. The transformation began in the late 1950s and 60s when corporations replaced the old neighbourhood. In the early 1960s, the houses were pulled down. Families were forced to 7) move out , the small stores went out of business and the old neighbourhood was changed forever. And now there is a lack of character in the transformed neighbourhood.

Text 2.16 A Storyteller In my early 20s, after a year and a half in England, and four months in France, I returned to the United States and got a job at a camp in northern Virginia. My 1) teammate that summer was Dan from Mississippi, and I am from Rhode Island. We worked together with a group of boys from 12 to 14 years old. I've always been a bit untidy, but Dan was 2) neat and clean, even after a night in the woods with our campers. We could not have been more different, but we got on because we shared the same 3) sense of humor. At the end of the summer, a few of us went to 4) explore a cave in West Virginia and got stuck in the cave for the night. It wasn’t as dramatic as it sounds. The park rangers had told us to stay there if anything happened. They knew where we were going, and when we should have been back. Dan hurt his right foot badly. So we had to 5) spend the night in the cave. Food and water were not a problem, but we turned off our lights to save power. In the distance, we could hear the sound of running water. To 6) pass the time, we told stories. That night in the cave we moved from one family story to another. As the night wore on, I remembered more and more. I was not alone–the cave, the blue light and the flowing water released stories and memories that we had never revealed to anyone. It was as if a river of stories had started flowing in each of us. When the rangers came the next morning, we didn’t want to 7) leave . "Can't we just tell a few more stories?" In the cave, that night, I became a storyteller.

Text 2.17 To Hear A Child I believe in patience. I live as a volunteer residential counselor in a small group home. These boys have brought joy and happiness into my life; they have made me laugh and made me proud. However, they have also challenged me, made me angry and tested my patience. Each day we start anew, going about a 1) daily routine. I drive them to school, pick them up, cook for them and help with homework. We spend the evenings 2) talking about what happened during the day. I meet their teachers and study for tests with them. They are the last people I see each night and the first ones I hear in the morning. They have become a 3) part of my life. I am twenty-two and am beginning to understand the love of a parent. I could not have come this far without patience. They do not think like miniature adults and it is not fair to expect them to. 4) although my expectations of them are high, I must remember that so much of what they see and understand is for the first time. First loves, first failed test, first time feeling the need to break away from the nest. I must have patience with them, because there is still a child within that comes out when I least expect it. This world is a fast-paced, fast food, fast-internet place. 5) nevertheless , no matter how fast things move, children will be children. I believe they will mature quicker and with more tools if I am patient. I see it in their eyes. Over time, sad eyes can glisten again, but only if I am 6) aware of the fact that it takes them longer to get somewhere. I see around them a world that expects too much of them. They come 7) across too many things that give them too much sadness. They listen to me, respect me and understand reason but not always when I want them to. This opportunity has given me wisdom but only when I was patient enough to hear a child.

Text 2.17 To Hear A Child I believe in patience. I live as a volunteer residential counselor in a small group home. These boys have brought joy and happiness into my life; they have made me laugh and made me proud. However, they have also challenged me, made me angry and tested my patience. Each day we start anew, going about a 1) daily routine. I drive them to school, pick them up, cook for them and help with homework. We spend the evenings 2) talking about what happened during the day. I meet their teachers and study for tests with them. They are the last people I see each night and the first ones I hear in the morning. They have become a 3) part of my life. I am twenty-two and am beginning to understand the love of a parent. I could not have come this far without patience. They do not think like miniature adults and it is not fair to expect them to. 4) although my expectations of them are high, I must remember that so much of what they see and understand is for the first time. First loves, first failed test, first time feeling the need to break away from the nest. I must have patience with them, because there is still a child within that comes out when I least expect it. This world is a fast-paced, fast food, fast-internet place. 5) nevertheless , no matter how fast things move, children will be children. I believe they will mature quicker and with more tools if I am patient. I see it in their eyes. Over time, sad eyes can glisten again, but only if I am 6) aware of the fact that it takes them longer to get somewhere. I see around them a world that expects too much of them. They come 7) across too many things that give them too much sadness. They listen to me, respect me and understand reason but not always when I want them to. This opportunity has given me wisdom but only when I was patient enough to hear a child.

Text 2.19 Searching for a New Programme A healthy lifestyle can vastly improve your well-being. This is a lifestyle designed for those who wish to feel more certain about their health and more in control of what the present and future will bring them in that important 1) area of existence. None of us wants to be sick. None of us enjoys the idea that we may become a medical statistic. This is a simple, easy-to-follow health-style that can enable you to get cards very much in your 2) favour . The doctors were fortunate enough to come into 3) contact with a field of study that brought them to healing and well-being that they so desperately needed. They personally have 4) witnessed thousands of people improve their health using only a small part of information. Many more people begin to improve their health now. Embracing the most current information from many health-related fields, the programme of healthy lifestyle gives you an understanding of the impact of exercise, breathing, sunshine, sleep and much more on your health. In order for this programme to work for you, you have to be willing to apply at least some part of it. Some change will be 5) required . And as you make those first modest changes, you will get positive results that encourage you to do more. Changing is fun. And if you realize that your new healthy lifestyle 6) involves the making of new habits, not the 7) breaking of old ones, you will feel very positive about what the future holds for you

Text 2.20 Cathy Cathy spent many hours during her lunch breaks poking around the dress shops before she bought the appropriate outfit for the Trumpers’ housewarming party. Her final 1) choice was a sunflower yellow dress which the shop assistant described as suitable for a cocktail party. Cathy became fearful at the last minute that its lack of length might be too daring for such a grand 2) occasion . But when Simon came to pick her up his immediate comment was “You’ll be a sensation.” His assurance made her feel more confident. 3However ), she forgot all her doubts the moment the butler invited them inside. While others drank champagne and helped themselves from the trays of canapés, she 4) turned her attention to pictures. First came a Courbet, a still life of magnificent rich reds, oranges and greens; then a Picasso of two doves surrounded by pink blossoms. She 5) enjoyed looking at them but she gasped when she first saw the Sisley, a stretch of the Seine with every paint of pastel shading being made to count. “That’s my favourite,” said a voice from

behind her. Cathy turned to see a tall, dark-haired young man give her a grin that must have made many people return his smile. “Quite beautiful,” she 6)admitted . “When I was younger I used to try and paint a little myself, and it was Sisley who finally convinced me I shouldn’t bother.” “Good heavens,” the young man said. “An expert in our presence.” Cathy smiled 7) at her new companion. “Let’s have a look at some more works in the upper corridor.”

Text 2.21 Sailing into an unknown future Tracy was as excited as a child about her first trip abroad. Early in the morning, she stopped at a tourist 1) agency and reserved a suite on the Signal Deck of the Queen Elizabeth II. The next three days she spent buying clothes and luggage. On the morning of the sailing, Tracy hired a limousine to drive her to the pier. When she 2) arrived at Pier 90, where the Queen Elizabeth II was docked, it was crowded with photographers and television reporters, and for a moment Tracy was panic stricken. Then she realized they were interviewing the two men posturing at the foot of the gangplank. The members of the 3) crew were helping the passengers with their luggage. On deck, a steward looked at Tracy’s ticket and directed her to her stateroom. It was a lovely suite with a private terrace. It had been ridiculously expensive but Tracy 4) decided it was worth it. She unpacked and then wandered along the corridor. In almost every cabin there were farewell parties going on, with laughter and champagne and conversation. She felt a sudden 5) ache of loneliness. There was no one to see her off , no one for her to care about, and no one who cared about her. She was sailing into a completely unknown future. Suddenly she felt the huge ship shudder as the tugs started to pull it out of the harbor, and she stood 6) among the passengers on the boat deck, watching the Statue of Liberty slide out of 7) sight, and then she went exploring.

Text 2.22 A Strange Girl Stephen pulled up the collar of his coat as he walked along the platform. Overhead a dim fog clouded the station. He was 1) watching trains move slowly, throwing off clouds of steam into the cold air. Everything was dirty and smoke-grimed. Stephen thought with revulsion: “What a foul country – what a foul city!” He had to 2) admit that his first excited reaction to London – its shops, its restaurants, its well-dressed attractive women – had faded. Supposing he were back in South Africa now… To 3) tell the truth, he felt a quick pang of homesickness. Sunshine – blue skies – gardens of flowers. And here – dirt, grime and endless crowds – moving, hurrying, jostling. He got on a train and passed along the corridor, looking for a place. The train was full. It was only three days before Christmas. He 4) used to go to his parents for Christmas… And then, suddenly, he caught his breath, looking into a carriage. This girl was different. Black hair, rich creamy pallor, the sad proud eyes of the South… It was all wrong that this girl should be sitting in this train 5) among these dull drab looking people. She should be somewhere splendid, not squeezed into the corner of a third class carriage. He was an observant man. He did not fail to 6) note the shabbiness of her black coat and skirt, the cheap quality of her gloves. 7) Nevertheless splendor was the quality he associated with her. He thought: “I’ve got to know who she is and what she’s doing here.”

Text 2.23 A CHINESE VASE When I was a child I loved visiting my grandmother. I thought her house was as beautiful as a palace. As I grew older the house and garden seemed smaller, but I still loved visiting the old lady. There were so many lovely things to look 1) at in the house. I loved her paintings and the old clock, but 2 ) most of all I loved a big Chinese vase which stood in the hall. It was 3 ) taller than me, and I couldn’t see 4) inside it. I walked round and round it looking at the beautiful ladies and the birds and flowers and trees, and Grandmother often 5 ) told me stories about these ladies. She said that her grandfather had brought the vase with him when he returned from a long 6 ) voyage to China. We live in a modern house, and I’m afraid my husband and I often nag at the children. “Don’t make the new carpet dirty, Paul!” “Be careful with the new table, Philip!” Before she died, Grandmother gave me the vase I loved so much. It 7 ) looked beautiful in our modern hall. One day I came home from the shop. The boys met me at the door. “I’m as strong as George Bes, Mummy,” said Paul. “I got a goal and I broke the vase.” Philip tried to be more diplomatic than Paul, “It doesn’t really matter, does it? You told us it wasn’t new. You aren’t cross, are you?”

Text 2.24 Amos It wasn’t unusual for Amos to go to Deravenels on Saturday, even though the offices were closed over the weekend. He 1) used to go to tidy up his paperwork and do other small jobs he couldn’t attend to during the week. But on this Saturday morning he had a specific purpose when he arrived at the grand old building on the Strand. The uniformed doorman 2) watched Amos close his umbrella and take off his raincoat. Then he touched his cap and said, “Good morning, Mr. Finnister”. Amos had come to the office to 3) make a few telephone calls. His first call was to the Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, where he quickly discovered the records office was not open on weekends. He then dialed Ravenscar and was put through to Edward Deravenel. “Good morning, Amos,” Edward said. “I’m assuming you have some news for me.” Amos then relayed all the information he had gathered the night before. “Well done, Amos!” Edward exclaimed. “Thank you for going into all this 4) trouble . I knew I could depend 5) on you. My wife will be happy as I am to know everything; it’s been such a mystery all these years. To 6 ) tell the truth, I think that Grace Rose should also know what happened to her mother. It will finally put her mind at rest.” “I agree, sir. I will telephone you on Monday”. Amos walked home, 7) paying no attention to the heavy rain. He felt happy.

Text 2.25 Daniel and Diana Daniel and Diana were good friends. They had majored in economics at Bristol University in the early 1980s. Then Daniel met Rachel, who had arrived a year after them, and fell in love with her at first 1) sight . In Rachel he found everything he was looking 2) for in a wife. They married the day he graduated, and after they returned from their honeymoon, David took over the management of his father’s farm in Bedfordshire. Three children followed in quick succession, and Diana was proud when she was asked to be godmother to Sophie, the eldest. Daniel and Rachel had been married for twelve years; they 3) hardly ever quarelled. 4) Few married couples were so happy. 5) Although Diane was regularly asked to spend the weekend with them in the country, she only accepted one invitation out of three. She would have liked to join them more often, but since her divorce she had no desire to take advantage of their hospitality. Diane felt tired. She 6) enjoyed her work, but it had been an awful week. Two contracts had fallen through, her son had been dropped from the school soccer team, and her daughter had never stopped 7) telling her that her father didn’t mind her watching television when she ought to be doing her homework. “I will survive.” Diana smiled and thought about Daniel’s birthday. She had forgotten to get him a present.

Text 2.26 Applying for a Job My new home was a long way from the center of London but it was becoming essential to find a job, so finally I spent a whole morning getting to town and 1) applying to London Transport for a job on the tube. It turned out that they were looking for guards, not drivers. This 2) suited me. I couldn’t drive a car but I could probably guard a train and perhaps continue to write poems between stations. “Yes, I would be a tube guard,” I thought. I could see myself being cheerful, useful, a good man in a crisis. The next day I sat down, with almost a hundred other 3) candidates,, for the intelligence test. I must have done all right because after half an hour’s wait I was sent into another room for a psychological test. The examiner sat at a desk. You were signaled forward to occupy the seat opposite him when the previous occupant had been 4) dismissed .Sometimes the person was rejected quickly and sometimes after quite a while. Obviously the longer interviews were the most successful ones. Mine was the only one that lasted a minute and a half. I can remember the questions now: “Why did you leave your last job, “Why did you leave your job before that? “And the one before?” I can’t 5) recall my answers, except they were short at first and grew shorter as we continued. His closing statement 6) revealed a lack of sensitivity, which helped to explain why as a psychologist he had risen no higher than the underground railway. “You have failed this test and we are unable to offer you a position.” Failing to get that job was my low point. Or so I thought, believing that the work was easy. Actually, such a job 7) demands exactly this sort of elementary responsibility a dreamer like me is unlikely to have. But, I was still far short of self-understanding as well as short of cash.

Text 2.27 Before Christmas Vicky gave this party every year, just before Christmas. She 1) used to do it before the war and she was doing it now, when the war was over. It was always the same people who came. It struck her suddenly how clannish they all were, but then the Deravenels in particular were somewhat addicted to their family. Vicky knew that she could always depend 2) on her relatives in a crisis. She was 3) watching the guests greet each other and share the news. Vicky thought of her sister-in-law Kathleen, not present tonight. Vicky missed her presence. When Will had arrived tonight, he had 4) told that Kathleen was really sick. “But not Spanish flu,” he had added swiftly, observing the look of apprehension crossing her face, “just a heavy cold.” Fenella’s voice brought her out of her reverie, and she looked across at her old friend, who was saying, "How is Charlie feeling?" “He’s relieved he is safely home, but his wounds still hurt and he feels depressed ..." She looked at Fenella as if 5) asking for advice. "Mr. Ridgely made a remark to me the other day that he wished there was somewhere wounded soldiers could go, to have some sort of recreation, talk to other soldiers," said Fenella. “That’s an interesting idea” Vicky glanced at the others, 6) raising a brow. “Don’t you agree?” “To 7) tell the truth, I do,” Stephen answered, always ready to back his wife in her project. “I think such a place would be quite marvelous for the wounded men who are now coming home.” Fenella nodded.

Text 2.28 Tracy Tracy was as excited as a child about her first trip abroad. Early in the morning, she stopped at a 1) tourist agency and reserved a suite on the Signal Deck of the Queen Elizabeth II. The next three days she spent buying clothes and luggage. On the morning of the sailing, Tracy hired a limousine to drive her to the pier. When she 2) arrived at Pier 90, where the Queen Elizabeth II was docked, it was crowded with photographers and television reporters, and for a moment Tracy was panic stricken. Then she realized they were interviewing the two men posturing at the foot of the gangplank. The members of the crew were helping the passengers with their luggage. On deck, a steward looked at Tracy’s ticket and 3) directed her to her stateroom. It was a lovely suite with a private terrace. It had been ridiculously expensive but Tracy 4) decided it was worth it. She unpacked and then wandered along the corridor. In almost every cabin there were farewell parties going on, with laughter and champagne and conversation. She felt a sudden ache of loneliness. There was no one to see her 5) off , no one for her to care about, and no one who cared about her. She was sailing into a completely unknown future. Suddenly she felt the huge ship shudder as the tugs started to pull it out of the harbor, and she stood 6) among the passengers on the boat deck, watching the Statue of Liberty slide out of7) sight , and then she went exploring.

Text 2.29 Two Rivals William and Philippa were rivals. They were considered the best students at New College.

At the beginning of the third year they applied for the Charles Oldham Shakespeare prize for an essay. The chosen theme for the prize essay that year was “Satire in Shakespeare”. Troilus and Cressida clearly called for the most attention, but both students 1) managed to find satirical nuances in almost every play by Shakespeare. As the year was coming to an end, 2) hardly anyone doubted that either William or Philippa would win the prize while the other would come in second. 3) However , no one was willing to express an opinion as to who the victor would be. Before the prize essay submission date, they both had to take their final degree examinations. 4) Few students studied as hard as William and Philippa. It came as no surprise to anyone that they both achieved first-class degrees in the final honors school. Rumor spread around the university that the two rivals had been awarded аs in every one of their nine papers. “I would be willing to believe that is the case,” Philippa 5) told William. “But I feel I must point out to you that there is a considerable difference between an A-plus and an A-minus.” “I couldn’t agree with you more,” said William. “But 6) remember , when you discover who has won the Charles Oldham, you will know who was awarded less.” It turned 7) out that the examiners felt unable on this occasion to award the prize to one person and had therefore decided that it should be shared by William and Philippa.

Text 2.30 In a Small Group Home I believe in patience. I live as a volunteer residential counselor in a small group home. These boys have brought joy and happiness into my life; they have made me laugh and made me proud. However, they have also challenged me, made me angry and tested my patience. Each day we start anew, going about a 1) daily routine. I drive them to school, pick them up, cook for them and help with homework. We spend the evenings 2) talking about what happened during the day. I meet their teachers and study for tests with them. They are the last people I see each night and the first ones I hear in the morning. They have become a 3) part of my life. I am twenty-two and am beginning to understand the love of a parent. I could not have come this far without patience. They do not think like miniature adults and it is not fair to expect them to. 4) although my expectations of them are high, I must remember that so much of what they see and understand is for the first time. First loves, first failed test, first time feeling the need to break away from the nest. I must have patience with them, because there is still a child within that comes out when I least expect it. This world is a fast-paced, fast food, fast-internet place. 5) nevertheless , no matter how fast things move, children will be children. I believe they will mature quicker and with more tools if I am patient. I see it in their eyes. Over time, sad eyes can glisten again, but only if I am 6) aware of the fact that it takes them longer to get somewhere. I see around them a world that expects too much of them. They come 7) across too many things that give them too much sadness. They listen to me, respect me and understand reason but not always when I want them to. This opportunity has given me wisdom but only when I was patient enough to hear a child.

Text 2.31 Your Future World What will you be doing in 2025? Will you be living in an undersea research station? Will you be the chief engineer 1) scheming a bridge across the Atlantic Ocean? Will you be leading an 2) expedition to the planet Mars? Will you be …? You can daydream, of course, but nobody knows exactly what the world 3) will be like . But scientists have made some guesses. Based on the advances made, they believe people will be healthier. Diphtheria, malaria, tuberculosis, polio and many other killers are under control now. These diseases are on the way out, 4) thanks to germ-killing chemicals, new ways of finding out about our bodies, and new ways of providing clean, safe 5) food and water. Healthier people live longer, so we can expect the world’s population to 6) increase sharply. It may double in the next forty years! This brings up a serious problem: how will we find food, water, and minerals for such a huge population? Scientists are at work on some 7) solutions . From the ocean they hope to get new fertilizers to increase the yield of the soil; new chemicals to kill crop-destroying insects without harming other animals, new sources of water or supplies of food

Text 2.32 Life Challenge At the age of twenty-one, Pierre – that was the name of the winegrower – had been sent by his father to spend some time with his uncle in Madagascar. He 1) arrived at the island and within two weeks he fell for a local girl called Faniry, or "Desire" in Malagasy. You could not blame him. At seventeen she was ravishing. In the Malagasy sunlight her skin was golden. Her black, waist-length hair, which hung straight beside her cheeks, framed large, fathomless eyes. It was a genuine love at first 2) sight , for both of them. Within five months they were married. Faniry had no family, but Pierre's parents came out from France for the wedding, even though they did not strictly 3) approve of it, and for three years the young couple lived very happily on the island of Madagascar. Then, one day, a telegram came from France. Pierre's parents and his only brother had been killed in a car crash. Pierre took the next flight home to 4) attend the funeral and manage the vineyard left by his father. Faniry followed two weeks later. Pierre was grief-stricken, but with Faniry he 5) settled down to running the vineyard. His family, and the lazy, idyllic days under a tropical sun, were gone forever. But he was very happily married, and he was very well-off. Perhaps, he reasoned, life in Bordeaux would not be so bad. Pierre thought he had married an angel, but soon he found 6) out that he was wrong. He had 7) made a fatal mistake in marrying Faniry.

Text 2.33 A QUIET HOUSE It was April and John Moore was studying for an important examination. As the date of the exam 1) drew nearer, he decided to go somewhere and read by himself. He did not want the amusements of the seaside, or the beauties of the countryside. He decided to find a quiet, little town and work there undisturbed. He 2) packed his suitcase with clothes and books. Then he looked in a railway timetable for a town that he did not know. He found one, and bought a ticket to go there. He did not tell anyone where he was going. After all, he did not want to be 3) bothered . That is how Moore arrived at Benchurch. It was a market town, and once a week itof the time it was a very quiet and sleepy place. Moore spent his first night at the only hotel in the town. The landlady was very kind and helpful, but the hotel was not really quiet enough for him. The second day he started 4) looking for a house to rent. There was only one place that he liked. It was more than quiet – it was deserted and very lonely. It was a big, old seventeenth-century house. It had barred windows like a prison, and a high brick wall all around it. It would be hard to 5 ) imagine a more unwelcoming place. But it suited Moore perfectly. He went to find the local lawyer, who was responsible for the house. Mr. Carnford, the lawyer, was very happy to rent the house to him. “I’d be glad to let you have it free,” he said, “. It’s been empty so long that people have started to 6 ) spread a lot of foolish stories about it. You’ll be able to prove that the stories are wrong. Moore didn’t think it was necessary to ask the lawyer for more details of the foolish stories. He paid his rent, and Mr. Carnford gave him the name of an old servant to 7) look after him. He came away from the lawyer with the keys of the house in his pocket.

 

Text 2.34 Looking for a Job My new home was a long way from the center of London but it was becoming essential to find a job, so 1) finally I spent a whole morning getting to town and applying to London Transport for a job on the tube. It turned out that they were looking for guards, not drivers. This 2) suited me. I couldn’t drive a car but I could probably guard a train and perhaps continue to write poems between stations. “Yes, I would be a tube guard,” I thought. I could see myself being cheerful, useful, a good man in a crisis. The next day I sat down, with almost a hundred other 3) candidates , for the intelligence test. I must have done all right because after half an hour’s wait I was sent into another room for a psychological test. The examiner sat at a desk. You were signaled forward to occupy the seat opposite him when the previous occupant had been 4) dismissed . Sometimes the person was rejected quickly and sometimes after quite a while. Obviously the longer interviews were the most successful ones. Mine was the only one that lasted a minute and a half. I can remember the questions now: “Why did you leave your last job, “Why did you leave your job before that? “And the one before?” I can’t 5) recall my answers, except they were short at first and grew shorter as we continued. His closing statement 6) revealed a lack of sensitivity, which helped to explain why as a psychologist he had risen no higher than the underground railway. “You have failed this test and we are unable to offer you a position.” Failing to get that job was my low point. Or so I thought, believing that the work was easy. Actually, such a job 7) demands exactly this sort of elementary responsibility a dreamer like me is unlikely to have. But, I was still far short of selfunderstanding as well as short of cash.

Подобається